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David Culler

Chair, Computer Science, Assoc. Chair of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, and Faculty Director, i4Energy
University of California, Berkeley

This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member.


David Culler is a Professor and Chair of Computer Science, Associate Chair of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, and Faculty Director of i4energy at the University of California, Berkeley.  Professor Culler received his B.A. from U.C. Berkeley in 1980, and M.S. and Ph.D. from MIT in 1985 and 1989.  He has been on the faculty at Berkeley since 1989, where he holds the Howard Friesen Chair.  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, an ACM Fellow, an IEEE Fellow and was selected for ACMs Sigmod Outstanding Achievement Award, Scientific American's 'Top 50 Researchers', and Technology Review's '10 Technologies that Will Change the World'.  He received the NSF Presidential Young Investigators award in 1990 and the NSF Presidential Faculty Fellowship in 1992.  He was the Principal Investigator of the DARPA Network Embedded Systems Technology project that created the open platform for wireless sensor networks based on TinyOS, and was co-founder and CTO of Arch Rock Corporation and the founding Director of Intel Research, Berkeley.  He has done seminal work on networks of small, embedded wireless devices, planetary-scale internet services, parallel computer architecture, parallel programming languages, and high performance communication, and including TinyOS, PlanetLab, Networks of Workstations (NOW), and Active Messages. He has served on Technical Advisory Boards for several companies, including People Power, Inktomi, ExpertCity (now CITRIX on-line), and DoCoMo USA.  He is currently focused on utilizing information technology to address the energy problem and is co-PI on the NSF CyberPhysical Systems projects LoCal and ActionWebs.