LAMIS — A Green Chemistry Alternative for Remote-Controlled Laser Spectroscopy

Photo of Alexander Bol'shakov, Xianglei Mao and Rick Russo in a lab setting
March 2012

At some point this year, after NASA's rover Curiosity has landed on Mars, a laser will fire a beam of infrared light at a rock or soil sample. This will "ablate" or vaporize a microgram-sized piece of the target, generating a plume of ionized gas or plasma, which will be analyzed by spectrometers to identify the target's constituent elements. Future Mars rovers, however, will be able to do even more. Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), in collaboration with Applied Spectra, Inc., have developed an advanced version of this laser technology that can also analyze a target's constituent isotopes. This expanded capability will enable future rovers for the first time to precisely date the geological age of Martian samples.

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Format: 2014-07-30
Format: 2014-07-30

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